After exiting my office suite to run errands during my lunch break yesterday afternoon, I selected “Let the Old Man Die,” the ninth song from Parable’s 1975 “More Than Words” album.

I had already inserted my AirPods in my ears when I got on the elevator at the seventh floor of my building. I was alone. The elevator car descended. It stopped at the fourth floor. The two doors opened. Four people wearing black and red Halloween costumes entered. The doors closed.

I immediately thought if they can be bold wearing Halloween costumes at work in my presence, I can surely be bold on the job singing about Jesus around them.

At this point I was at the 54-second mark of “Let the Old Man Die” song.

Chuck Butler of Parable and his background vocalists were about to sing,

“And I want to see sweet Jesus,
“Open up my eyes.
“I want to see sweet Jesus,
“Let the old man die.”

So when that part of the song came the four people clad in Halloween costumes heard me boldly sing,

“And I want to see sweet Jesus,
“Open up my eyes.
“I want to see sweet Jesus,
“Let the old man die.”

The four people on the elevator stood there in silence after I sung that part of the song.

(I actually inwardly chuckled).

I recalled that one of the people to my left looked at me. The elevator arrived on the first floor. The doors opened. We all walked out. No one said a single solitary word.

At this point I had a visible smile on my face, but I was inwardly laughing as I buoyantly walked through the lobby and exited the building.

I told some friends about it. I still smile about it now as I write this blog.

I’d sure like to tell Chuck Butler and his disbanded Parable band that “Let the Old Man Die” was a witness to people in 1975, and “Let the Old Man Die” is a witness to people more than 44 years after they composed/sung it.

Click on this link to listen to “Let the Old Man Die.”


If you’ve never heard of Parable —a mid-70s Christian contemporary rock band— and want to download their 1975 “More Than Words” album, and/or their 1977 “Illustrations” album, both are available on iTunes.

There have been a couple occasions when the elevator was packed. The two doors open. The people look at us all crammed inside. The passengers and me say we can still take more. They reluctantly enter the elevator. The two doors close. I then sing:

“There’s room at the cross for you.
“There’s room at the cross for you.
“Though many have come.
“There’s still room for one.
“There is room, at the cross for you.”

One time I did this and a Christian brother looked at me, he and I both smiled.

So I witness by singing Christian Songs